#SHReads18 – In Which Order to Read Sherlock Holmes Stories?

When I started thinking of writing this post, I didn’t even suspect that there might be different ways of reading Sherlock Holmes stories. Naturally, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was rather prolific, in spite of his developed frustration with the character that brought him fame, but it never occured to me that somebody could read the stores not in the publicated order – because it was the way I read them as a child.

Continue reading

My 2018 Reading & Blogging Goals

Book Shelf

 

December came and went in such a quick flash that it took me by surprise. I, unsurprisingly, failed at Blogmas. But now I am ready to revive my blog once again. And what can be better but reading & blogging goals?

 

In 2017, my reading/theatre goals were simple:

 

  • read 100 books (GoodReads challenge) – which I did
  • watch 10 theatre plays – I watched 24 and will talk about them later
  • listen to 20 audiobooks – I came close but didn’t hit 20

 

I also wanted to read one book in French and one book in German, and I didn’t even come close to doing that. So, I am going to try again in 2018.

Continue reading

Book review: “Arrowood” (Arrowood #1) by Mick Finlay

Sherlock Holmes stories have been part of my life since very childhood. I grew up completely obsessed with Sherlock Holmes (and The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas – but that’s for another story). After Sherlock Holmes came Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot and some others, but Sherlock Holmes has always been number one.

I have read a few pastiches based on Conan Doyle’s stories and characters, as well as some other detective stories set in Victorian England.

It has been awhile since I discovered new Victorian England stories. And then I saw a book by the title of Arrowood at Indigo.

The tagline was so appealing that I had to restrain myself from buying it on spot.

London Society takes their problems to Sherlock Holmes. Everyone else goes to Arrowood.

Continue reading

Book review: “Dividing Eden” (Dividing Eden #1) by Joelle Charbonneau

I was attracted to “Dividing Eden” based on the cover and the fact that it was a new release. I even almost purchased my own copy, as I checked out the book from the library but then had to return it and then had to wait till it became available again. In the end, I read the library copy, and I am glad that I didn’t spend money on it.

Yes, it is going to be one of those reviews.

Continue reading

Blog: John le Carre – An Evening with George Smiley

There is nothing like reading a well-written book by an intelligent and knowledgeable author. Through into the mix lots of espionage, cultural references and a subtle British humour, and you get an incredible reading experience. And that is John le Carré’s books in the nutshell.

 

John le Carre

 

John le Carré is a British author of espionage novels. During the 1950s and ’60s, he worked for both the Security Service and the Secret Intelligence Service. His third novel, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963), became an international best-seller and remains one of his best-known works. Following the success of this novel, he left MI6 to become a full-time author. In 2011, he was awarded the Goethe Medal.

Continue reading

Book review: The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo (KonMari method)

One of my most favourite videos to watch on YouTube are organization videos, in which people share their tips on cleaning and organizing their rooms, closets, cupboards, etc. I find it both soothing and inspiring. Inspiring to reorganize my own stuff.

While browsing YT and IG for such inspiration, I came across several posts that mentioned “KonMari”. I couldn’t figure out what it meant, until I googled it and learned about Marie Kondo and her books.

 

KonMari

 

I purchased this book, started to read it, and couldn’t put it down.

Continue reading