Musical review: Falsettos (Broadway Revival) – Live from Lincoln Center

Falsettos

 

I am so used to going to special events and broadcasts at Cineplex on Thursdays, that I almost completely missed a broadcast of “Falsettos” on Wednesday, July 12 (yes, I am a bit behind on reviews – thanks for noticing 😅).

 

“Falsettos” was one of those classic ‘know nothing about but it sounds gay, so I am going to watch it’ moments for me. I got a ticket almost last minute – which for me means a day or two ahead – and spent a lovely evening laughing my heart out.

 

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Book review: Peter Darling by Austin Chant

Have you ever been in a situation when you don’t know what to read and then randomly find a book and it is exactly what you have been craving but you just didn’t know that? Well, this is what I felt when I started reading “Peter Darling” by Austin Chant, after seeing it being recommended by Cece at ProblemsofABookNerd. I still mentally salivate when I think about it.

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My #LGBTQIAREAD TBR

Okay, I am not very good with TBRs or read-a-thons or read-a-longs as I am a moody reader and prefer to read what I want to read in a particular moment. But when I watched George’s video on YouTube announcing Queer Read-A-Thon, I just had to sign up! I mean, I read queer lit anyway, and it is Pride Month, so I am going to do it!

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Book Review: Long Story Short: An Anthology of (Mostly) 10-Minute Plays

 

I was provided a copy of this anthology by Playwrights Canada Press in exchange of a free and honest review.

 

“Long Story Short” is an anthology of short plays by Canadian playwrights of diverse backgrounds. The introduction by Rebecca Burton gives insight into how she picked the plays and on the background of the authors. Selected plays are intended to appeal to a variety of readers and variety of tastes as they range in genres from satire and comedy to absurdist and dystopian and encompass an array of topics from coming of age, love, relationships, race, gender norms, and death. Every read is bound to find something to their taste.

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Book review: “Otherbound” by Corinne Duyvis

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“Otherbound” is, undoubtedly, a very unique novel. It is a YA fantasy novel, told from two perspectives – one is a disabled boy in our world and another is a disabled girl in a fantasy world. Whenever Nolan blinks, he is not Nolan, but Amara – a mute girl servant who has to protect the cursed princess. Because Nolan can’t quite literary close his eyes even for a second, unless Amara is asleep, he is considered to be epileptic, as he is constantly sucked into a different reality.

This book has two very diverse protagonists who have to deal with a lot of hardships in their lives. They are connected in some inconceivable way, which is very disruptive for their lives. They want nothing more but to be rid of this link. But when they try to do it, something goes wrong.

I don’t want to say much about the plot as I might give something away.

I liked the book although the jerky narrative sometimes made it a bit difficult for me to get into. I really tried to like Amara, but she seemed too volitive and unpredictable for me. I liked Nolan way better, and I found his perspective to be more engaging, even though I did love Amara’s world and their system of magic. I disliked Nolan’s parents though, even though they were trying really hard.

I can’t say much about the princess as I tried liking her and failed. But the plot line surrounding her is really well done.

Overall, it was a very pleasurable read. Not something that I would like to read again, but definitely a book that deserves attention. I had a bit of an issue with the way the plot was wrapped up at the end, but I want to give the author kudos for keeping me on my toes till the very end.

Personal rating: 4 stars